Participants

Professor of theoretical physics at the University of Cologne, Claus Kiefer does research on quantum gravity and the foundations of quantum theory as well as studying black holes and more general cosmological questions. He was educated at the University of Vienna and at the University of Heidelberg, where he completed his undergraduate work and went on to take a Ph.D. in physics summa cum laude in 1988. After postdoctoral research at the University of Zurich, he joined the physics faculty of the University of Freiburg as a lecturer in 1993. He was named to his present position in 2001. Dr. Kiefer previously chaired the Committee on Gravitation and Relativity of the German Physical Society and currently serves on the advisory boards of the Annalen der Physik and Classical and Quantum Gravity. Last year, his essay, “Does Time Exist in Quantum Gravity?,” was awarded second prize by the Foundational Questions Institute, an organization supporting research and the dissemination of research findings in physics and cosmology that is funded by the John Templeton Foundation. The author or co-author of more than 150 papers published in scientific journals or as chapters in volumes of collected works, Dr. Kiefer is the co-editor of three books, (with Friedrich H. Hehl and Ralph J.K. Metzler) Black Holes: Theory and Observation (1998), (with Philippe Blanchard, Domenico Giulini, Erich Joos, and Ion-Olimpiu Stamatescu) Decoherence: Theoretical, Experimental, and Conceptual Problems (2000), and (with Domenico Giulini and Claus Lämmerzahl) Quantum Gravity: From Theory to Experimental Search (2003). He is also the co-author (with Erich Joos, H. Dieter Zeh, Domenico Giulini, Joachim Kupsch, and Ion-Olimpiu Stamatescu) of Decoherence and the Appearance of a Classical World in Quantum Theory (2003) and the author of four other books, Quantum Gravity (2004 and 2007) in addition to three titles in German, Quantentheorie (2002 and 2004), Gravitation (2003), and, most recently, Der Quantenkosmos, which was published by Fischer in 2008 and, in a new edition, last year.