Participants

Helen M. J. Alford, OP, professor of economics and business ethics at the Pontifical University of St. Thomas (“the Angelicum”) in Rome, serves as vice-dean of the Angelicum’s Faculty of Social Sciences (FSS) as well as co-director of its Ethical Leadership International Program. Her research is concerned with the role and impact of ethics and Christian social thought in the field of management, particularly in regard to corporate social responsibility (CSR). She has recently focused on impact investing for the common good in light of Pope Francis’s apostolic exhortation Evangelii Gaudium (Joy of the Gospel) and is developing links between the Thomistic natural law and virtue tradition with economic thought. Educated at King’s College, Cambridge, Dr. Alford earned a Ph.D. in engineering management at Cambridge in 1993. She subsequently studied theology at Blackfriars, Oxford, and at both the Pontificio Ateneo Sant’Anselmo in Rome and the Angelicum. As a visiting professor, she taught in the graduate manufacturing systems engineering program and in the theology department at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota, for a term before returning to England to begin her novitiate with the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena Newcastle, Natal, South Africa (‘Bushey Sisters’) in 1994. She joined the Angelicum’s social science faculty two years later and was named a full professor in 2009. Dr. Alford served as dean of the FSS for twelve years. She currently directs the master’s program in management and CSR, a joint endeavor of the Angelicum and LUMSA (Libera Università Maria Ss. Assunta) in Rome, as well as serving as a consultant to the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace and as academic director of the Inspiration Foundation in Treviso, Italy. A member of the academic boards of the Veritatis Splendor Institute and the Fondazione Italiana Europa Popolare, she also serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Catholic Social Thought, Finance and the Common Good, Transforming Business, and OIKONOMA: Journal of Ethics & Social Sciences. In addition to papers published in academic journals or volumes of collected works, she is the co-author (with Michael J. Naughton) of Managing as if Faith Mattered: Christian Social Principles in the Modern Organization (2001), which has been translated into Spanish, Russian, Hungarian, and Chinese, and, most recently, the co-editor (with Francesco Compagnoni) of Preaching Justice: Dominican Contributions to Social Ethics in the Twentieth Century, which was published by Dominican Publications in 2007. She is currently completing books on the contribution of Dominican sisters to social justice in the 20th century and on the Catholic university in Central and Eastern Europe.